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UGA President Adams named one of Georgia’s most influential - The Red and Black : Ugalife

UGA President Adams named one of Georgia’s most influential

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Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 7:00 am | Updated: 1:51 pm, Thu Sep 5, 2013.

During his final year as president of the University of Georgia, Michael F. Adams was recognized as one of Georgia’s most prominent figures by Georgia Trend Magazine.

Adams made his 17th appearance on the Most Influential Georgians: Georgia’s Power List through his contributions to UGA.

While Adams’ latest influences include establishing the College of Engineering and teaming up with the Medical College of Georgia to provide a four-year medical education program in Athens, Adams and his staff were also forerunners for the environmentally efficient proposal known as the Master Plan. 

As a member of this list, Adams earns his spot through his overall effect — not only his standing as president.

“We look at impact, not just position,” said Jerry Grillo, executive editor of Georgia Trend Magazine. “For the university system, he’s one of those slam-dunk obvious choices.”

Adams is recognized not only through his initiatives but also UGA’s growth since his presidency began June 11, 1997. In Adams’ 17 years at UGA, enrollment has increased by almost 6,000 students, and approximately $1 billion have gone to construction.   

“The University’s reputation has grown and enrollment has increased,” Grillo said. “And the University continues to draw millions in research dollars from around the country.”

For teachers at UGA, the reputation precedes the man. Only some actually interact with Adams and are able to know the reputation along with the man holding it.

“He is just as much a stranger to me as he probably is to you,” said Dr. John Nicholson, a professor of classics at UGA.

Both Adams and his staff view the recognition as an honor for Adams, as well as for UGA. Although it is not a foreign concept, the accreditation is still respected and seen as a reflection of the institution as a whole.

“It is emblematic not only of Adams, but of the presidency itself,” said Tom Jackson, vice president for public affairs.

Although Adams will step down from the presidency on June 30, his achievements and contributions will be remembered long after his retirement.

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2 comments:

  • Bleed Red and Black posted at 2:26 pm on Wed, Jan 16, 2013.

    Bleed Red and Black Posts: 92

    Also....he may have done 50 great things, but human nature will always make people remember the bad or stupid thing he did. Such as not honoring Coach Dooleys request to finish a year or two later. That's what he'll be remembered for, right or wrong.
    Look at majority of employers, spouses, or clickish social circles, for instance. People can do 100 things right, but when they do something wrong, they're always remembered for that. That is Dr. Adams lot in life, now as an ex-president of UGA.
    Shouldn't have been so short-sighted and power crazed Dr. Adams.

     
  • Bleed Red and Black posted at 1:57 pm on Wed, Jan 16, 2013.

    Bleed Red and Black Posts: 92

    Always be remembered for cheapshot move of pushing Vince Dooley out the door.
    It was a garbage bully shot just to show off his own power. It was totally unnecessary.
    A simple extension to allow Coach Dooley one or two years max to complete his career as AD would have made the transition easier and more pleasing to the entire University. And it would not have hurt or embarrassed the University and divided many parties within by becoming such a public spectacle. It was a power grab, pure and simple, against a well respected person/employee who has served our university well for 40 years. And who has taken the high road and continues to serve the University in many different capacities.
    We will always honor and respect Coach Dooley for his service. I doubt we will always honor or respect Dr. Adams.