BUGA

Users posting with the #WhosWhoInBUGA include details about themselves such as their class year, major and hobbies. They also may include invitations of friendship and advice from current students. (Courtesy/Jalen Carter, Sarah Olatidoye)

While scrolling through Twitter, you might notice the influx of posts under #WhosWhoInBUGA. Initiated by the Georgia Daze Minority Recruitment Program at the University of Georgia, this hashtag has been around since 2018 and has welcomed prospective and incoming students to the UGA community.

Users posting with the hashtag include details about themselves such as their class year, major and hobbies. They also may include invitations of friendship and advice from current students.

The Georgia Daze Twitter kicked off this year’s hashtag on April 2, just in time for the start of Georgia Daze Weekend during which admitted high school seniors from historically underrepresented groups experience UGA and its culture through an overnight visitation program. This year, Daze Weekend was held virtually with most of the events taking place over Zoom along with some social media campaigns.

Camille Jones, a junior biology and spanish major and Georgia Daze president, said the hashtag has been used this season to introduce prospective UGA students to one another, as well as introduce them to current students and the organizations they are involved in.

For current students, the hashtag brings the community together, Jones said. For prospective students, it’s important because it gives them an opportunity to see the different organizations UGA has to offer including UGA’s National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, UGA’s National Council of Negro Women and the Divine Nine, or National Pan-Hellenic Council, Greek letter organizations.

“It’s an important way for students to see our community and how many of us there are,” Jones said.

This is sophomore international affairs major Sarah Olatidoye’s first year participating in #WhosWhoInBUGA. While COVID-19 has posed difficulty in meeting new people, Olatidoye decided the hashtag was a good way to reach out to new Black students who may want to connect over shared interests.

“The Black community at UGA is pretty small; however, I think we fail to realize there’s so many other students we don’t know who might have similar interests to us. It reminds us of all the new people we have to meet and connect with,” Olatidoye said.

Similarly, for the incoming students who might be intimidated by a school with a small number of Black students, it can be reassuring to see other students of similar backgrounds and passions, Olatidoye said.

“There’s a lot of experiences you can have [at UGA], and that can be based on the organizations you’re involved with … or the people you hang around. ... But really, it’s the student who makes their experience what it is,” Olatidoye said.

Jalen Carter, a freshman psychology major, learned about the hashtag through some of his friends who used it on social media. He said it makes the UGA community more welcoming to newcomers.

“[At UGA] you’re going to get some of the best professors and education, and the football games are nice too,” Carter said. “It’s an experience you won’t regret.”