BoJack Horseman

Season five of "BoJack Horseman" was released on Sept. 14, 2018.

Season 5 of Netflix original “BoJack Horseman” is the most self-aware and vulnerable season yet, even including one noteworthy episode with a monologue at a funeral.

If you have a Netflix account, you’ve probably heard of the original animated phenomenon “BoJack Horseman.” The series is an animated show for adults where its main character is a washed-up, humanoid-horse actor named BoJack. The show follows his misadventures as he tries to become relevant again.

Over the past four seasons, the show handled topics from drug overdoses to abortions while steadily maintaining a sense of comic relief throughout the overarching storyline. Each season, the audience waits and watches in agony as BoJack takes one step forward in bettering himself. However, he ends up taking two steps back and makes one monumental mistake at the end of each season that causes the viewers — and BoJack himself — to hate him.

Season 5 of the show dropped on Sept. 14. The new season takes a dark look at the show itself and brings out the darkness in every character involved in BoJack’s life. This leaves audiences to ask the question, “Is BoJack even worth forgiveness anymore?”

If you have been watching the show over the past four years you would know that while the show has been labeled a comedy, it will also make you sob. This season is no different.

Without giving away too many details, this season involves drug abuse, assault, sexual harassment and death but still manages to keep audiences laughing. This season is the wildest emotional rollercoaster yet, and as the audience, you’re just along for the ride.

In the past four seasons, the show makes fun of today’s pop culture but this season was different — the show made steps toward being self-aware and breaking down the “fourth wall.” One thing different from previous seasons is BoJack is finally successful. He is on a show named  “Philbert” where he plays a rogue detective who fights for what’s right, in contrast to his own life, where he doesn’t know which end is up.

Before addressing BoJack, you have to first discuss the rest of the characters — even though BoJack is the titular character of the show, his actions tend to cause a domino effect on the people that surround him.

Diane and Mr. Peanutbutter’s relationship takes the hardest hit yet, from non-existent to way-too-close-for-comfort.

Todd may finally get his act together, with a job that, of course, he’s not equipped to handle. Princess Carolyn may finally reach her dream of being a working mother after struggling for so long to have a child of her own, but at what cost?

BoJack’s aforementioned screw-up may be the hardest one to take and leaves viewers with little to no hope for his future.

The entire season led up to it, but it was one mistake that made me as a viewer audibly gasp. Once again the season ends with BoJack trying to make amends and take responsibility for his actions, but this was something that was so detrimental and traumatizing to another person in his life that they couldn’t be around him anymore.

Instead of just reaching out to Diane to discuss his wrongdoings, Season 5 actually ends with BoJack finally getting the help he needs at a rehab facility, which goes to show how critical this mistake actually was. As always audiences will have to wait to see if this outside help will actually make a difference. For now, viewers will have to ponder the ultimate question: can BoJack really can be redeemed this time around?

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