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This week on The Front Page, we discuss the University of Georgia's reopening with two professors who signed onto the recent faculty petition condemning the move. Dr. Mark Ebell, epidemiology and biostatistics director at UGA's College of Public Health, and Dr. Amy Trauger, professor in UGA's Department of Geography, each give their thoughts on the university's reopening.

Dr. Ebell speaks about the university's testing system and current procedures. Dr. Trauger discusses her experience as a professor with a preexisting condition and UGA's support for professors teaching online.    

You can listen in this window, or find us on Apple Podcasts and Spotify.

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(1) comment

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Ebell, on UGA’s response:

“They’re not really following the CDC guidance, which is quite clear--when there is what they call substantial community transmission, then you should be begin online, and you should go to in-person instruction when there are only a small number of new cases per day, when test positivity is consistently less than 5%, and when test results can be returned in a couple of days so you can do contact tracing. Some results are now taking a week or longer to come back, which makes contact tracing irrelevant, frankly”.

Ebell also discusses the need for random sampling for surveillance tests. The school appears to have moved to random sampling, but it’s still ultimately voluntary, and it’s still to my knowledge only 300 people per day, significantly less than Georgia Tech, for instance.

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