Chris Conley.jpg

2011 stats: 16 catches, 288 yards, 2 touchdowns

University of Georgia sophomore flanker Chris Conley has been selected to represent the Southeastern Conference as a member of the NCAA Division I Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC). Conley’s two-year appointment begins immediately.

The Division I SAAC consists of one student-athlete from each of the 31 Division I conferences and reports directly to the Leadership Council. The mission of the DI SAAC is to enhance the total student-athlete experience by promoting opportunity, protecting student-athlete well-being, and fostering a positive student-athlete image. Service on the DI SAAC involves attending three in-person meetings a year (July, November andJanuary), as well as participating on a number of conference calls throughout the year. The January meeting is held in conjunction with the NCAA NationalConvention, giving the SAAC an opportunity to interact directly with college athletics leaders.

“It is a great honor, and I feel like it’s a big opportunity for me to not only affect my teammates but also student-athletes nationally, and give them a voice,” said Conley. “This is an opportunity for me to lead and to be a servant. I want to learn as much as I can so that I can be as helpful as I can.”

Conley, a native of Dallas, Ga., played in 11games last season and registered 16 catches for 288 yards and two touchdowns. Conley is a pre-journalism major who was named to the SEC Academic Honor Roll and the UGA Athletic Director’s Honor Roll last year.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.