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The Standard at Athens, an apartment complex on North Thomas Street in downtown Athens, Georgia, on Friday, November 16, 2018. (Photo/Caroline Barnes, caroline.barnes3710@gmail.com)

The Standard is a popular apartment complex for students at the University of Georgia. Its convenient downtown Athens location and numerous amenities attract many students. Countless students can be found hanging out by the pool during the summertime, but some may ask: Is the high cost worth it?

Julianne Price, a junior psychology major, is a resident at The Standard.

“This is the fourth apartment complex I’ve lived in while in college, and it has definitely been the most impressive,” Price said. “Of course it isn’t perfect, but then again, most places aren’t.”

While she enjoys the apartment complex overall, Price explained the multiple problems she and many other residents have faced in the complex.

“It seem as though most apartments are struggling with fruit flies,” Price said. “We also had our air conditioning go out twice within the first month here. The second time around it took them around four days to fix it, and our apartment got up to about 88 degrees,” Price said. “I have also heard people complain about mold in their rooms, but that is not an issue I have personally seen.”

Olivia Curtis, a sophomore finance major, has also been living at The Standard in a four-bedroom apartment since the start of the semester.

“I really love it,” Curtis said. “The location has been really convenient. The walk to most of my classes is about 20 minutes, and it’s about a 10-minute walk to the Arch.”

Residents can choose their number of bedrooms, ranging from one to five. Each apartment comes fully furnished. Features include hardwood floors, smart TVs, stainless steel appliances and granite stone countertops.

The complex includes a rooftop pool, fitness center, recreation center, outdoor community kitchen, lounges and a study room with computers and a printer.

“My rent is about $779 a month plus electric,” Curtis said. “I think it’s worth it because of the amenities and location. I use the study room and the rooftop pool the most.”

On the other hand, Liam Grant, a junior management information systems major, has been living at The Standard for two years and estimates his rent to be about $820 for a three-bedroom apartment.

“I think the high cost is worth it, but barely,” Grant said. “The location and amenities are a plus. The amenities I utilize the most are the coffee machine, grill and gym. I personally don’t like how big it is.”

Parking is included in the rent. Each resident receives a parking pass, but residents can pay extra to have a reserved spot.

“Compared to last year, management seems a little more strict in parking specifically. They tow you if you aren’t in the right reserved spot or you don’t have a hang tag in the garage. They didn’t check that as much before,” Grant said.

Curtis does not pay for a reserved spot and finds parking to be difficult at times.

“The only drawbacks I can think of after living here for a few months is that the parking garage is very full and sometimes difficult to find a spot on your level unless you pay extra for a reserved spot,” Curtis said.

Next year, The Standard is adding a requirement of renter’s insurance and $15 per month for parking or $30 per month for reserved spot parking.

“Between the added parking fee and the renter’s insurance they are going to require residents to have, I have started looking for different housing for next year, so it’s safe to say I was not happy about it,” said Price, whose parents pay her rent.

Grant is unsure if he will live at The Standard next year, but he hasn’t ruled it out.

“If I were to move, I would want somewhere with less people. Price doesn’t matter too much. I just look for a location close to campus,” Grant said.

The Standard declined to comment on its parking deck and new fees.

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(1) comment

danieljackson

Why did the news editor approve this? What is this, a hit piece on The Standard?

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